6 Basic Movement Patterns

We all have exercises that we like, and therefore do a lot; and there are exercises that we dislike, and don’t do, unless we’re forced. I have them too. We tend to gravitate towards those bodyparts that we enjoy training, and steer clear from those that we don’t. The problem with doing the same exercises over and over again (and not doing others ever) is that you risk injury. When one group of muscles is significantly stronger than another group, you will move differently than if your muscles are balanced in strength. Strong muscles pull on other muscles in the body, and weaker muscles stretch out. An example of that might be if you have weak lower back, the stronger muscles in the glutes and hamstrings will pull on your lower back muscles. That could pull your pelvis out of alignment, and cause pain not only in your lower back, but also Read More . . .

Lunge L/Lateral Raise/Lunge R/Rear Raise

Set Up: Stand with your feet about hip width apart. Feet should be parallel or toes just slightly pointed out. Either hold the ends of one dumbell in each hand, or hold one dumbell in each hand. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Lunge one foot back, and return to standing. Review the Lunge for demonstration on the lunge movement. As you rise from the Lunge position, perform a Lateral Raise. Review the Lateral Raise  for demonstration on the movement. Lunge the other foot back, and return to standing. After you rise from the Lunge position, bend over and perform a Rear Raise. Review the Rear Raise  for demonstration on the movement. Specific Cues: Do not look at the ground. Use weight appropriate for the Lateral Raise or the Rear Raise. Related Exercises Lunges Lateral Raise Rear Raise Read More . . .

Lunge/Squat/Squat Jump

Set Up: Stand with your feet about hip width apart. Feet should be parallel or toes just slightly pointed out. Either hold the ends of one dumbbell in each hand, or hold one dumbbell in each hand. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Lunge one foot back at a time, and return to standing. Review the Lunge for demonstration on the lunge movement. Squat with your weights on either side of your legs – or if you’re not using weights, hands can be at your hips or by your sides. Review the Goblet Squat for demonstration on the squat movement. Squat Jump. Specific Cues: Do not look at the ground. Review cueing for the Squat movement, the Lunge movement, and the Jump Squat When finishing the jump Squat, Do NOT land on straight legs. Doing so will put a lot of stress on the knees. So, although it will hurt, from the Read More . . .

Lateral Raise

Major Muscles Worked: Shoulders Set Up: Stand with your feet closer than hip width apart. Feet should be parallel to each other. Hold one dumbbell in each hand by your sides. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: With your palms facing each other, slightly bend your elbows. Relax your shoulders down away from your ears. Keeping the bend in your arms the same, arc your elbows out and up so that you’re lifting the weights towards the ceiling. Keep your torso stationary. At the top of the motion, slightly rotate your hands down so that your pinky fingers are closer to the ceiling than your thumbs. Reverse the motion, and lower the weights with control. Specific Cues: If your torso is moving a lot, you may need lighter weights. Think about the movement as coming from your elbows – versus lifting the weights. The movement is similar to you pouring water from a Read More . . .

Burpee/Push-up/Renegade Row

Set Up: Stand with your feet hip width apart or closer at the top of your mat. Hold one dumbbell in each hand. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Start by bending over, and placing the dumbbells on the floor. Kick your feet back so that you are in a high plank position. Perform a push-up Perform the Renegade Row movement Jump your feet up towards your hands. Stand, taking the weights with you. Notes: This is a freakin’ HARD exercise! If the video seems a bit choppy, it’s becasue I edited out the valuable seconds that you didn’t want to watch me catching my breath! You can alternate the rowing motion (as I did in most of the sets) or you can do one side at a time (like I did in the 3rd set). As you tire, you could put your knees down in the push-up Read More . . .

Tricep Extension

Major Muscles Worked: Triceps Set Up: Stand with your feet hip width apart or closer. Either hold the ends of one dumbbell in each hand, or hold one dumbbell in each hand. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Start by hinging at the hips. Lower your upper body to about a 45 degree angle. Keep your core engaged to support your lower back. Your back should stay flat. DO NOT ROUND YOUR BACK! Using gravity as resistance, start by shrugging your shoulders back towards each other. Relax your shoulders down away from your ears. Follow through with your elbows, lifting the weight into your rib cage. At the top of the motion, extend your forearms so that they extend towards your hips. Reverse the motion so that your forearms are perpendicular to the floor. Specific Cues: You may feel some fatigue in your lower back. Keep your core Read More . . .

Row/Tricep/Curl/Press

Set Up: Stand with your feet hip width apart or closer. Hold one dumbbell in each hand. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Start by hinging at the hips. Lower your upper body to about a 45 degree angle. Keep your core engaged to support your lower back. Your back should stay flat. DO NOT ROUND YOUR BACK! Using gravity as resistance, start by shrugging your shoulders back towards each other. Relax your shoulders down away from your ears. Follow through with your elbows, lifting the weight into your rib cage. At the top of the motion, try to get your elbows to touch in the back of your body. They’re never going to touch, but try anyway. Reverse the motion, and lower the weights with control. Specific Cues: Review the Row exercise Use a weight appropriate for the Tricep Extension exercise. This is not a fluid movement. There are Read More . . .

Vintage Swing/1 Arm Row

Set Up: Place a dumbbell on it’s end, on the floor. Stand with your feet hip width apart with the dumbbell behind your heel line. The Movement: With one hand, grab the shaft of the dumbbell with your wrist straight, and your thumb pointing down. Being bent over in this position is going to be uncomfortable. As you release the dumbbell from the floor, explosively press your hips forward, keep your arm straight. At the top of the movement, your hips should be forward, standing straight up. Your bicep should be next to your ear. With control, slowly lower the weight to your shoulder. Squat As you rise from the squat position, Press the weight to the ceiling. With control, slowly lower the weight to your shoulder. With control, bend over, and place the dumbbell on it’s end behind your heel line, as you were in the starting position. Specific Read More . . .

Stiff Legged Deadlifts (aka: Romanian Deadlifts)

Major Muscles Worked Legs, Posterior Chain (all the muscles in the back of your body) Set Up: Stand with your feet closer than hip width apart. Feet should be parallel to each other. Hold one dumbbell in each hand by your sides. Chest is up, shoulders are back. The Movement: Keeping your back flat, and shoulders rolled back, hinge at your hips. Stop when you feel a stretch in your hamstrings or lower back. Pause Reverse the movement. Specific Cues: Push your hips back. Keep your back flat/neutral. Don’t let your knees track forward—press them back. Pull your chest forward. Review: Hinging Read More . . .

Hinging

https://youtu.be/d-RPWoZHjhk Note The Hinging movement is one of the six core movements in strength training. The video illustrates proper hinging technique first, and improper hinging second. The hinge is not a squatting movement. You’ll notice that my knees bend, however I’m not explicitly bending my knees like you would do in a squat. Also, notice that my knees are not hyper-extended. This exercise can be challenging for folks who sit a lot. When we sit, we tend to bend at the thoracic spine (lower back), versus hinging at the hips. If you do sit at a desk all day, you can help train your posture by placing bottle caps on your chair right at each of your glute muscles. THis will remind you to sit up straight. 😉 Set Up: Hold a stick (broomstick, golf club, yardstick, whatever. Just something about 3 feet long & straight) vertically along your spine. Read More . . .